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when our deficit's been cut in half, it allows us to meet our obligations to future generations without leaving them a mountain of debt. >> woodruff: the 2015 deficit would decline, to $560 billion, but republicans today said the red ink, spending hikes and tax increases mean the plan is dead on arrival. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. >> rather than put together a constructive blueprint the two parties could use as a jumping off point, to get our economy moving and our fiscal house in order, the president has once again opted for the political stunt for a budget that's more about firing up the base in an election year than about solving the nation's biggest and most persistent long-term challenges >> woodruff: congressman paul ryan, the house budget chair, likewise called the obama plan a disappointment. in a statement, he said: >> woodruff: ryan offered an extensive critique yesterday of federal anti-poverty efforts. he's expected to release a republican budget proposal in the coming weeks. >> woodruff: some of the more notable pieces of the president's proposal, and expected
terrible five years ago, but we can have a deficit, which creates more debt but not at a rate that grows faster than gdp grows. the trend is wrong. there is a danger if that goes on, although a lot of countries have gone far beyond. i don't like to see it go up as a percentage. this country is in wounderful shape. >> finally, looking at the stock market today, there are people nervous about what happens with the situation in ukraine. you would tell them? >> i would tell them it doesn't change anything. if you have a wonderful business of your own in illinois, why would you sell it today because of what is happening in the ukraine? if you have a farm producing, an apartment house that's fully occupied, why would you sell it today because of the ukraine? that's the same if you have a piece of a wonderful business or pieces of many wonderful businesses. people react to short-term things and react quite ra rationally. >> he checked out the price of a stock he had been buying in london last friday, if prices drop like we've been seeing, he says he'll just buy more. for "nightly business repor
fight, the deficit battle. he had a very difficult re-election. just a month before, he gave an interview with black enterprise magazine he said, i'm not the president of black america. he didn't want that idea that he was favoring one particular group. i did an interview before that election. and i found out that when he came down with his senior aids just week bfers he got re-elected, he had a yellow note pad. even if this wasn't an issue, he put criminal justice reform on there and he started pushing -- gwen: we've got to go. michael's more in story in "time magazine." >> we have to leave to give you a chance to support your local pbs station. but our conversation will continue online on the "washington week" web cast extra. it streams live at 8:30 and all ek long at pbs.org/washingtonweek. and that's where you'll find my take and why 1997 was such a big year for "washington week." we're accepting birthday wishes. we'll see you next week. good night. >> corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old
it calls a growing infrastructure deficit of crumbling roads, bridges and highways. in a report to congress to the dot says washington needs to spend as much as $146 billion a year to maintain and improve the nation's roads and crossings starting right away. >>> to retail where japan's fast retailing the parent company of unico is in talks to buy jay crew. according to the wall street jourl, j crew's management is seeking $5 billion for the business. but it's unclear whether fast retailing is willing to pay that price in a statement the company says it doesn't comment on market speculation. >>> pier one imports cuts its outlook for the second straight month because of snowed-in shoppers. that is where we begin tonight's market focus. the home furnishings retailer blamed the harsh winter for soft traffic. the company did say it expects business to be normal once the weather gets better. still shares down more than 5.5% today to $18.92. it was the opposite story for 3d systems. the 3d printer maker gave investors a strong outlook, predicting its $1 billion in revenue in 2015. now, this quarte
a current account deficit, whether you are on the production side of commodities or the consumption side of commodities. clearly there are some particularly hard-hit emerging markets leaving the ukraine aside for a moment. you've got the now so-called fragile five, brazil, india, indonesia, south africa and turkey. and those are some of the most beleaguered areas. but there are also going to be some winners. we have a fairly optimistic view on china which is by far the biggest within the emerging markets sphere. >> wish we had more time to explore that with you. liz ann, always a pleasure talking to you. thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. >> liz ann saunders, chief investment strategist at charles schwab. >>> if you're wondering which well-known u.s. companies have some of the biggest exposure, among them are general motors. it makes about 100,000 cars a year at a plant near st. petersburg and it's hoping to expand operations next year. ford operates three plants with a russian automaker. exxon mobile formed an alliance with russia's state-owned oil company in 2011 exploring for oi
deficit disorder,
in somebody's life, it shows up there. >> yes, what we can see is there is a deficit in theiar in the ae middle frontal cortex of kids who have ptsd. >> brown: in the developing brain of a child, ptsd can discourage learning. >> so the issue we have with chronic stress, it manifests as a ptsd syndrome or disorder is that some of the areas that are affected are areas that we need for our learning. for example, brain centers that process memory, brain centers that process executive function are particularly vulnerable. so ptsd can have an effect in how children learn brown. >> brown: according to carrion, up to 30% of children who live in low-income, high poverty neighborhoods will show symptoms of p.t.s.d. for every child in our school who acts out, i can look to something in their life that's not working. every single time there's a concrete and sad story about why this child doesn't get what they need. >> bring your arms up, put your left leg around your knee. >> brown: by teaching children to pay close attention to breathing and movements, the medical student hopes they're better prepa
it was not a contributor to overall debt deficit. so i wanted to look at both access and containment. and he said i did it because he worried if he didn't do it then, there would never be no chance to do it. >> i think that's right. that has to do a lot with the book i'm writing about that so i looked at that pretty carefully. what i don't think he was able to do, and i use the term able very carefully because the political climate of getting even this bill passed was so tough. he had no extra votes. was to do much about containing costs. so the good news is that many of the thousands of people who wrote to me after the first article about horror stories being forced into bankruptcy or moving their loved ones because they couldn't afford healthcare. a lot of that has been fixed. >> rose: in terms of trying to get different ends meet and getting it through congress, on balance did they choose the right program. did they essentially put together what was necessarily for political consensus and get it through the congress. there were rnlt a lot of republican votes. >> i think they could have done it di
of the city as a whole so that we instead of seeing elderly new yorkers as a deficit, as a problem to be solved. instead we say the world is fundamentally a changing place, we're living longer, were living healthier and older new yorkers now are here in numbers that have surpassed anything in history. >> sreenivasan: one key ingredient to the initiative is listening to seniors, according to ruth finkelstein of the new york academy of medicine. she leads the initiatives private sector efforts. >> everything we do is grounded in the perspectives and voices of older adults. the first thing that they have to realize is we don't stand in the shoes of the people that were addressing and that we need first and foremost to understand the city through their perspective. >> sreenivasan: the program is now up and running in all five boroughs, including manhattan, where we met up with ed and sarah aarons. they cant imagine living anywhere but here. >> and i can't conceive of having the facilities and conveniences and the excitement as other places. >> the only two places he would like to live
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)